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, the pentagon is about to make it official. women can serve on the frontlines. we'll look at what it means for the future of the u.s. military just ahead. [ male announcer ] eligible for medicare? that's a good thing, but it doesn't cover everything. only about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you. so consider an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement plans, they help save you up to thousands in out-of-pocket costs. call today to request a free decision guide. with these types of plans, you'll be able to visit any doctor or hospital that accepts medicare patients... plus, there are no networks, and you'll never need a referral to see a specialist. join the millions who have already enrolled in the only medicare supplement insurance plans endorsed by aarp... and provided by unitedhealthcare insurance company, which has over 30 years of experience behind it. with all the good years ahead, look for the experience and commitment to go the distance with you. call now to request your
rhetoric, or does north korea really have the capability to attack? pentagon correspondent barbara starr has all the details. >> reporter: north korea's latest sabre rattling. threatening the south just one day after pyongyang said it will lob missiles at the u.s. and conduct a new nuclear test, leaving no doubt leader kim jong-un isn't giving up his father's nuclear program. the u.s. might not is advanced warning of a new underground test. >> they have the capability, frankly, to conduct these tests in a way that make it very difficult to determine whether or not they are doing it. >> reporter: but there are signs they're ready to test if ordered. >> the north korean are maintaining a fairly high state of readiness at the test site. that means that if the order is given from pyongyang to go ahead, they can probably conduct the test in a few weeks. >> reporter: satellite imagery shows a tunnel entrance where the device may undergo final assembly. a bunker for personnel and equipment. and a communications network to make sure the order to detonate can be carried out. north korea's weapons
by the pentagon when it was revealed that he sent e-mails to kelly that some officials found flirtatious. >> so the general allen situation, david, just your gut on that. what a mess. >> i don't know what the internet version of a tempest in a teapot is, but this is one where the pentagon, i think, rushed to investigate behavior, where there was very little evidence of wrongdoing. the fbi and the justice department had been reviewing all these e-mails, as part of their investigation of general petraeus. and they threw them all over the pentagon. the pentagon goes, geez, what do we do now? and they decided, gosh, i guess we better investigate them. so the inspector general at the pentagon was ordered by secretary panetta from his plane, he's traveling and says, gosh, we better do the investigation. so that's been rolling along. and there was never a thought to be evidence of real wrongdoing. general allen has been held up. he's our commander in kabul. he's a very fine general. and so it's good that this finally ended today. >> so what we've got, 9:00 eastern time, in about 15 minutes, the bengha
of wrongdoing by the pentagon. this, as jill kelly, the woman who triggered the investigation in the first place, speaks out for the first time. nbc's kerry sanders is outside kelly's home in tampa, florida, this morning. kerry, good morning. >> reporter: good morning, savannah. it's been three months since news broke of the secret love affair between general david petraeus and his biographer, paula broadwell. it all came to light after jill kelly, who lives in the house over there, contacted the fbi about what she called threatening e-mails. throughout all of this, jill kelly has remained silent, until now. socialite jill kelly was thrown into the media spotlight last october as the story of general david petraeus and his affair with biographer paula broadwell unfolded. kelly was described in the media as the other, other woman. now she's telling her side of the story in an interview with a reporter for the daily beast, describing the ordeal as a living nightmare. >> jill kelly seemed to me to be someone who didn't quite know what hit her. she doesn't think she did anything wrong. her life has
issues, particularly gay rights, were settled during his first term, when at the pentagon and throughout all military service, "don't ask, don't tell" was ended under his watch and he embraced formally for the first time gay marriage across the country. what arguments are to be settled for fought for in the future? climate change, immigration and tax reform among others. the president did at one point in his speech say there are some parts of government that need to be reformed, but our usefulness of one small olive branch to republicans. but we are not a nation of takers and the fundamental foundations of the great society, medicare, medicaid and social security will be preserved under his watch and the encroachments republicans would like to make on those programs from the president's perspective in the name of deficit reduction will be, if not repelled, at least resisted. scott? >> major, thank you very much. this is the crowd in washington, d.c., live, as they begin to wander away from the national mall, after witnessing american history firsthand. during the president's first inaugu
to so sole ya vega. >> i'm here. hey, good afternoon. we made our way over from the pentagon where we were at the staging area and came over on a bus full of teenager matching band from tennessee. they were really excited and we walked our way through the mall here and made our way close to the capitol. you can see a lot of the crowd is dissipating. a lot are headed over to that paid we'll see later this afternoon. we heard all of our friends, david muir and bill weir talking about the excitement and the level of excitement you can feel just walking through this crowd. it's so palpable. one woman i just met while making my way over stopped me in my tracks during the invocation, she literally had tears streaming down her face and i said why are you so emotional? she said my grandfather could not vote. she says my family was beaten, we were slaves. we were literally slaves. she said today i feel free. i said, is it any different this time around from four years ago? she said it's even tweeter today because we have victory twice, so, yes, this is a crowd of believers and, yes, this is a
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)